QGIS for Hydro – Second Edition

We are excited to announce our first updated work for 2022!

QGIS for Hydrological Applications – Second Edition is now available as an e-book. Built on the latest improvements from QGIS 3.22+ it also has 10% more pages and various improved workflows and recipes.

Save $10 (28%) this month by using e-book coupon code: WATERISLIFE when adding it to your cart.
Print versions of the updated book are coming later this month. Subscribe to our newsletter to be the first to hear of new books and projects.

Read more on the book’s store page, including a comprehensive table of contents and overview of new features.

Year End Sale – 20% off geospatial e-books

Save on our final sale of the year

Use this coupon code until Jan 2nd to get 20% off e-books.

Pick any Locate Press e-book and enter the coupon code: XMAS21
The 20% discount will be applied when you add it to your cart.

Sign up for our newsletter to get receive future subscriber-only discounts.

Share the sale with your friends

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Educators save with 5 or more books

Need books for an event or course? Normally we limit bulk discounts to larger orders, but anyone can place an order with us directly – for at least 5 books and we will give a 20% retail discount. That’s like buying four and getting one for free.

What you do with them after is up to you – resell, giveaway, or get them autographed at an event – your call!  

Larger orders may enjoy even steeper discounts. We ship globally and print in USA, UK, and Australia.

Email tyler@locatepress.com with your order. 

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GIS Week Sale – 35% off geospatial e-books

11-day sale to Celebrate November and GIS Week

Enjoy a 35% discount on all Locate Press e-books from Nov 8-19th:

  • Find an e-book here
  • Select Buy PDF
  • Enter Coupon Code: GISDAY2021
  • Add to Cart, Checkout, and save big!

Sign up for our newsletter to get receive future subscriber-only discounts.

Share the sale with your friends

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Beat Amazon! Save on your print orders by ordering direct and getting 20% off 5 or more books of any titles (can be 5 different titles).

Contact us below with your order and mailing address – we’ll supply a quote and a link to process credit card payments.

We print in USA, UK, and Australia where we offer the best shipping rates.

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October Newsletter (2021)

Hi and welcome to our short October Newsletter. Whether you are a new subscriber or an old customer, we want to stay in touch. This newsletter highlights one way to save on print orders, how to update your profile, and how to stay in touch.
We also include a link to an interesting podcast on Geospatial Python with Anita Graser and MapScaping. Watch our next newsletter for the upcoming e-book sale in November.

Nearing 10 years of being in business

Locate Press has grown a lot in just under 10 years, from 1 title to over a dozen. During that time we’ve moved to more digital products and look for new ways to stay in touch with both e-book and print book customers. 

We are using this newsletter forum to help stay in touch but in a focused way – e.g., sharing updates about your favorite books – previously we did not have a way to communicate with focus.

Now you can update your profile to opt-in to specific topics of interest.

Save money with 5 or more books

Need books for an event or course? Normally we limit bulk discounts to larger orders, but anyone can place an order with us directly – for at least 5 books and we will give a 20% retail discount. That’s like buying four and getting one for free.

What you do with them after is up to you – resell, giveaway, or get them autographed at an event – your call!  

Larger orders may enjoy even steeper discounts. We ship from USA, UK, and Australia.

Email tyler@locatepress.com with your order. 

Stay connected – follow more regular updates and discussion here

One last thing.

We regularly look for friends and affiliates that share topics of interest with our members. This MapScaping podcast is a good one. Locate Press author Anita Graser lays out the Geospatial Python landscape. We think you’ll enjoy it.

Locate Press swag now available: hats, shirts, stickers, and more.

What is Geospatial Technology?

Geospatial technology brings tools and data together to describe, map, and analyze the world around us and worlds yet to be discovered.


The term geospatial is a relatively new invention at least in the parlance of mainstream developers. Geospatial can refer to types of data or to types of technology. The word itself is a combination of geographic and spatial – indicating an alignment between geography and the general idea of spatial/locational properties. Spatial concepts (think geometry and statistics) do not necessarily represent a place on a planet until they are combined with ideas of geography in general.

Built on the history of Geographic of Information Systems (GIS)

GIS is a technical domain, usually for geographers, that allows users to make digital maps and subject them to various types of analysis. Sources of GIS data may include satellite or aerial imagery (raster data) or line map data (vector data) delineating points, lines, or regions of interest – created by surveyors, engineers, photo interpreters, etc.

While many GIS projects output maps, their primary goal is to develop observations about a project area and overlapping properties and values. For example, land-use planning typically requires a GIS process to compare/contrast all the competing values – economic, social, environmental, etc. These are thought of as layers of spatial data that overlap one another and can be combined to show different management priorities or scenarios.

Where do deer live in the winter compared to a planned highway development in a popular tourist corridoor – many values in one location often need advanced tools to build a complete picture.

Geography made digital

While GIS helps bring geography into the digital domain, geospatial technology helps bring it to life for more people. Beyond specific GIS projects, there are many more data sources, cartographic products and ways to output maps for different consumers . Collectively, these fall into the region of geospatial data and technology.

Web-based mapping really helped propel the generalized use of geographic data into the mainstream. Before Google Maps was introduced in 2005, there were only a handful of common web-based mapping tools available for the public to use. Developers started to build their own open-source platforms to share information and collect input.

This required a whole stack of technology including geographic data, web servers, spatial databases, rendering libraries, web-interaction libraries (zoom/click/pan), and the internet itself. Geographers or GIS users may only be a small part of the overall project or not involved at all.

In the end, a handful of different technologies are needed to bring digital geospatial data to life.

Broader than just spatial analytics

Building new geospatial web-mapping tools was one part of the journey. Naturally, the more people use mapping tools, the more questions they want to answer. For example, consider how popular Google Maps became due to its driving directions. This level of spatial analytics was profoundly useful for those driving in a new location. But only a small set of built-in analytics was really ever possible with this platform – or so it seemed.

Data analysts and GIS users are used to running specific types of routines on data to get an answer. For example, calculate an optimal route from A to B. Or what is the expected water course derived from this elevation model?

However, with modern geospatial technology, the user may view and interact with the data in a more real-time approach to build understanding before they ever run an analytical routine.

They may never click a “analyze” button but can use a 3D map view to get a sense of where water will flow, or look at the streets around them to compute their own driving path in their head. In this sense, geospatial tools help them leverage geographic data in a context that is intensely personal.

Collection of mapping technology

So what tools and technology are considered geospatial in nature? As noted in the “stack” of technology above, it is a wide-ranging set of technology. It can be helpful to look at the two types of end-users that typically leverage geospatial technology: software developers and data analysts.

Geospatial developers take data of interest, depending on their domain, and create applications that allow their target audience to interact with the data in a meaningful way. This may mean taking data that is not always spatial in nature – like a list of addresses or stores running sales – and turn it into a component on a map for viewing and querying.

Location-based applications using GPS tracking on a device are also used by developers to give localized awareness of nearby data or attributes the developer wants to expose.

Geospatial analysts – often work more behind-the-scenes and provide types of data analysis outputs that get used by application developers, GIS users, or even in reports or web sites for general public consumption.

Geospatial analytics for all

Analysis with geospatial data components is not limited to one domain of analyst anymore. Data scientists or business analysts may combine data from many sources – spatial or not – to provide a common operating picture of a business or project.

Therefore, libraries and processes for analyzing geospatial data have become ubiquitous or are at least a common subset of analytical routines that many have access to. Both desktop and web-based approaches to sharing data along with analytical tools continues to grow in popularity.


Locate Press sells books for learning and applying geospatial technology, written by experts in their field:

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